Program 9

AIRDATE:03/13/01

PROMO: Dr. Mohyuddin Mirza, Greenhouse Crops Specialist at the Crop Diversification Central North, Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, and Adjunct Professor, University of Alberta

Dr. Michael Ellison, Professor of Biochemistry and Director of the Institute for Bio Molecular Design, University of Alberta

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ITEM:1

TITLE: Dr. Mohyuddin Mirza, Greenhouse Crops Specialist at the Crop Diversification Central North, Alberta Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, and Adjunct Professor, University of Alberta
SUBJECT: #9 Diversified Greenhouse Crops
SYNOPSIS: The greenhouse industry is becoming increasingly important to Alberta, accounting for annual revenues of 95 million dollars. At this time greenhouse operators provide vegetables including cucumbers, tomatoes, lettuce and peppers as well as bedding plants, cut flowers and tree seedlings to the local market. Alberta grown medicinal plants also show potential. Dr. Mohyuddin Mirza is involved in various research projects for greenhouse crops which are focused on improved yield, optimum growing mediums, and insect and disease control. A tour of the Alberta Agriculture greenhouses north of Edmonton shows work in progress on gotukola, echinichea, burdock, climbing squashes, experiments on a bacteria to biolically control fungus that attacks seedless cucumbers.

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ITEM:2

TITLE: Dr. Michael Ellison, Professor of Biochemistry and Director of the Institute for Bio Molecular Design, University of Alberta
SUBJECT: #9 Project Cyber Cell
SYNOPSIS: It took millions of years for living cells to change and evolve. Put those cells in a virtual environment and you can evolve them in the twinkling of an eye. That's part of the excitement for Dr. Michael Ellison as he begins work on Project Cybercell at the University of Alberta. With the aid of a bank of complex computers and mass spectrometers, Michael's team of scientists will spend the next ten years mapping the 4000 proteins of e. coli to develop "virtual living cells". These cybercells can then be manipulated, changed, and grown all on the computer. One major application is drug testing, thereby reducing the time, expense and uncertainty involved in developing new drugs. Alberta Innovation and Science has contributed funding towards Project Cybercell

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