Program 16

AIRDATE:05/27/01

PROMO: Stephanie Grossman, Masters Student, Conservation Biology, University of Alberta Dr. Patrick Hettiaratchi, Associate Professor in Civil Engineering and Coordinator of the Environmental Engineering Program, University of Calgary Vincent Stein, Research Assistant, Civil Engineering, University of Calgary Dr. Sandy Gow, Professor of History, Concordia University

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ITEM:1

TITLE: Stephanie Grossman, Masters Student, Conservation Biology, University of Alberta
SUBJECT: #16 Forest Fragmentation and Owls
SYNOPSIS: There is a point when the landscape becomes so fractured from farming and other industrial activities, owls and other raptors simply disappear. University of Alberta Masters student Stephanie Grossman is trying to find out at just what point that happens. In the first part of her study, she is focussing on owls. From the middle of February to the middle of May she has spent almost every night from 9 p.m. until 4 the next morning driving around the countryside to predetermined points, playing recorded owl calls and collecting data on owl populations. With Elk Island National Park and Ministik Bird Sanctuary as benchmarks, she is looking for the differences in raptor populations in landscapes ranging from heavily forested to non-forested.

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ITEM:2

TITLE: Dr. Patrick Hettiaratchi, Associate Professor in Civil Engineering and Coordinator of the Environmental Engineering Program, University of Calgary & Vincent Stein, Research Assistant, Civil Engineering, University of Calgary
SUBJECT: #16 Methane and Landfill Solutions
SYNOPSIS: There's alchemy in a pile of dirt, and Dr. Patrick Hettiaratchi intends to put it to good use to curb methane emissions from pipelines and wellsites. Bacteria in soil and compost oxidizes methane, turning it into carbon dioxide. Patrick and his assistant Vincent Stein are researching the best medium for the job. Some soils produce more slime, which hinders the oxidation process. Once the biofiltration technology is perfected, you may find wellsites and pipelines across the landscape covered with piles of dirt or what we will soon be calling "bio-reactors".

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ITEM:3

TITLE: Dr. Sandy Gow, Professor of History, Concordia University
SUBJECT: #16 History of Oil Field Technology
SYNOPSIS: With the poor living conditions and daily hazards, you'd wonder why people would even work in the oilpatch during the 1920's and 1930's. As Dr. Sandy Gow discovered, it wasn't just wages, because many times, the roughnecks were not paid. They got snookered on "no jack" jobs. But during the Depression, people working on the rigs were provided food and shelter. And at a time when many people lost their farms and their homes, food and shelter was as good as it got. Sandy is writing a book on changes in oilfield technology

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