Program 41

AIRDATE:11/27/01

PROMO: Wolf Wilbert, Architect and Inventor, Wolf Building System Dr. John Payzant, Research Chemist, Advanced Materials Unit, Alberta Research Council Dr. Om Srivastava, Distinguished Chemist and Manager of Carbohydrate Research, Alberta Research Council

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ITEM:1

TITLE: Wolf Wilbert, Architect and Inventor, Wolf Building System
SUBJECT: #41 Wolf Hook Building System
SYNOPSIS: Imagine framing house in a third of the time and never having to pick up a hammer or nail. That's exactly what Edmonton architect Wolf Wilbert has accomplished. He wanted to do for housing construction what Ikea has done for furniture. Its taken 15 years, but his "house in a box" system is now ready for global distribution and he expects his invention will revolutionize the construction industry. And just exactly what is his invention? Its a piece of formed steel he calls the Wolf Hook. Its so strong, a house built with Wolf Hooks can roll down a hill and not fall apart.

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ITEM:2

TITLE: Dr. John Payzant, Research Chemist, Advanced Materials Unit, Alberta Research Council
SUBJECT: #41 Diapers for Landfills
SYNOPSIS: Landfills are notorious for leaching nasty things into groundwater. So a lot of work has gone into developing different technologies and barriers to prevent this from happening. Chemist Dr. John Payzant of the Alberta Research Council has come up with an advanced material which essentially "puts a diaper" on landfill leachate. The chemistry he's developed for a new moisture barrier uses polymers similar to those used in disposable diapers to soak up fluids and prevent leaks. The liner is one third the weight of conventional materials and may also be useful in wrapping basements to prevent seepage.

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ITEM:3

TITLE: Dr. Om Srivastava, Distinguished Chemist and Manager of Carbohydrate Research, Alberta Research Council
SUBJECT: #41 New Instant Flu Test from ARC
SYNOPSIS: One of the major problems in public health is the over-prescription of antibiotics, a result of the misdiagnosis of infections like influenza and colds. An Oklahoma biotech firm, Zyme Tx Inc, has discovered a way to quickly detect whether flu like symptoms are caused by viral or bacterial infections. This firm approached the Alberta Research Council because of its world wide reputation in Life Sciences to help develop the processes that would allow the test to be produced on a large scale. Dr. Om Srivastava of the ARC developed the commercialization processes for the new test which detects neuraminidase enzyme activity within the flu virus. The technology depends on the introduction of a special carbohydrate molecule that causes a reaction with the virus. The new flu test takes only twenty minutes and indicates a viral rather than bacterial infection when the test filter turns blue. This quick and easy diagnostic tool is particularly important with the advent of bioterror agents such as anthrax which manifest with flu like symptoms.

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