Program 45

AIRDATE:01/08/02

PROMO: Dr. Margaret-Ann Armour, Assistant Chair, Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, and Vice-Chair WISEST Committee
Dr. Paul Sorenson, Associate Vice-President of Research, University of Alberta
Dr. Michael Brett, Professor and Director of Engineering Physics, iCORE Fellow, Nanoscale Engineering Physics Initiative, and Micralyne-NSERC Industrial Research Chair, University of Alberta
Dr. Chris Backhouse, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta

AUDIO: Download Audio (mp3 format)

ITEM:1

TITLE: Dr. Margaret-Ann Armour, Assistant Chair, Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, and Vice-Chair WISEST Committee
SUBJECT: #45 WISEST Award Winning Scientist
SYNOPSIS: As a chemist, Dr. Margaret-Ann Armour has gained prominence in the field of hazardous waste disposal. But she is also highly regarded for her work to promote women in science. Margaret was one of the founding members of the WISEST Committee (Women in Scholarship, Engineering Science and Technology) established over twenty years ago at the University of Alberta as a vehicle to break the gender barrier among students and faculty. The Canadian Association of Teachers has recently presented an award to Margaret for her work as a mentor to young women.

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ITEM:2

TITLE: Dr. Paul Sorenson, Associate Vice-President of Research, University of Alberta
SUBJECT: #45 Nanotechnology
SYNOPSIS: University of Alberta Edmonton researchers are among the world's leaders in the new field of nanotechnology. Working across a number of disciplines, from health to electrical engineering, these researchers are developing new processes, materials and devices the size of mere molecules and single cells. Their collaboration helped bring the new Nanotechnology Institute to the University of Alberta. As Dr. Paul Sorenson explains, a grant of $120 million dollars over the next five years will support the facility and bring researchers from across Canada to work in the labs and microfabrication unit. Those already working at the nano scale include Dr. Michael Brett who has developed a thin film with spring like shapes and Dr. Chris Backhouse who is refining a microfluidic device that can be used as a "lab on a chip" for early detection of cancer and other health problems.

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ITEM:3

TITLE: Dr. Michael Brett, Professor and Director of Engineering Physics, iCORE Fellow, Nanoscale Engineering Physics Initiative, and Micralyne-NSERC Industrial Research Chair, University of Alberta
SUBJECT: #45 Nanotechnology
SYNOPSIS: University of Alberta Edmonton researchers are among the world's leaders in the new field of nanotechnology. Working across a number of disciplines, from health to electrical engineering, these researchers are developing new processes, materials and devices the size of mere molecules and single cells. Their collaboration helped bring the new Nanotechnology Institute to the University of Alberta. As Dr. Paul Sorenson explains, a grant of $120 million dollars over the next five years will support the facility and bring researchers from across Canada to work in the labs and microfabrication unit. Those already working at the nano scale include Dr. Michael Brett who has developed a thin film with spring like shapes and Dr. Chris Backhouse who is refining a microfluidic device that can be used as a "lab on a chip" for early detection of cancer and other health problems.

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ITEM:4

TITLE: Dr. Chris Backhouse, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta
SUBJECT: #45 Nanotechnology
SYNOPSIS: University of Alberta Edmonton researchers are among the world's leaders in the new field of nanotechnology. Working across a number of disciplines, from health to electrical engineering, these researchers are developing new processes, materials and devices the size of mere molecules and single cells. Their collaboration helped bring the new Nanotechnology Institute to the University of Alberta. As Dr. Paul Sorenson explains, a grant of $120 million dollars over the next five years will support the facility and bring researchers from across Canada to work in the labs and microfabrication unit. Those already working at the nano scale include Dr. Michael Brett who has developed a thin film with spring like shapes and Dr. Chris Backhouse who is refining a microfluidic device that can be used as a "lab on a chip" for early detection of cancer and other health problems.

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