Program 7

AIRDATE:02/27/01

PROMO: Terry Macyk, Senior Researcher, Alberta Research Council
Al Berschi, Plantation Coordinator, Alberta Pacific Forest Industries
Michelle Tracy, Masters Student in Human Ecology, University of Alberta

AUDIO: Download Audio (mp3 format)

ITEM:1

TITLE: Terry Macyk, Senior Researcher, Alberta Research Council
SUBJECT: #7 Pulp Mill Sludge as Soil Enhancer
SYNOPSIS: Pulp mill sludge from Alberta's three mechanical pulp mills produce 150 bone dry tonnes of sludge per day. Over a year, that's several hundred thousand tonnes of sludge going to landfill. Terry Macyk has worked over the last ten years researching the alternative use of this waste as a soil enhancer for spreading on farm land and the forest.

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ITEM:2

TITLE: Al Berschi, Plantation Coordinator, Alberta Pacific Forest Industries
SUBJECT: #7 Pulp Mill Fly Ash as Soil Enhancer and Dust Inhibitor
SYNOPSIS: In 1995, Al Berschi approached Alberta Pacific with an idea that could reduce the company's waste and earn him a masters degree in the process. Al studied the use of flyash as a soil enhancer. The fly ash is leftover from the company's wood residue incineration process to produce electricity for the mill. As part of his research, Al spread combinations of fly ash and biosolids from the mill on poor agricultural land that was then planted with hybrid poplars. The fly ash acted as a liming agent. As a result of the landspreading program, the trees have increased their growth rate by 25 to 45 percent and the life of the landfill has been doubled.

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ITEM:3

TITLE: Michelle Tracy, Masters Student in Human Ecology, University of Alberta
SUBJECT: #7 Mrs. Umperville's Beadwork
SYNOPSIS: In 1971, Michelle Tracy took her first teaching job in northern Manitoba. There she became friends with Mrs. Philomene Umperville, a Metis woman of extraordinary talent. Thirty years later, Michelle has made the exquisite beadwork of Mrs. Umperville the focal point of her masters research in Human Ecology. Among the many issues Michelle is exploring is the anonymity of women artisans. While their work is collected by museums around the world, native women are rarely credited for their work

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