Program 76

AIRDATE:01/28/03

PROMO: Dr. Cam Goater of the U of L studies parasites that infect the brains of fathead minnows

Dr. Kaz Szymocha develops heated snowsuit for the Alberta Research Council

Grant Meikle sets up North America's first BioGem power system at the Iron Creek Hutterite Colony to turn manure into electricity and heat

AUDIO: Download Audio (mp3 format)

ITEM:1

TITLE: Dr. Cameron Goater, Professor of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge
SUBJECT: #76 Parasites in Fathead Minnows
SYNOPSIS: When it comes to headaches, pity the poor fathead minnow. Imagine having 600 parasites eating away at your brain. That's the day to day reality for these little fish. The brain parasite is just one of many parasites that infest these minnows. But what's amazing is not only that the little fish survives these infestations, it somehow can also repair the brain damage. Trying to understand this and the role of parasites in the ecosystem is the focus of research for Dr. Cameron Goater, a professor of biological sciences at the University of Lethbridge.

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ITEM:2

TITLE: Dr. Kazimierz Szymocha, Senior Research Scientist, Alberta Research Council
SUBJECT: #76 Heated Snowsuit
SYNOPSIS: From furs to fleece, we've covered our bodies with just about everything to keep our bodies warm in the winter. Dr. Kazimierz Szymocha is a research scientist with the Alberta Research Council. Usually he works on soil remediation technology. But a little down time after solving that problem left his inventor'sbrain free to run wild. And the result was a snowsuit heated with fire.

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ITEM:3

TITLE: Grant Meikle, Vice President of Marketing and Sales, BioGem Power Systems
SUBJECT: #76 Biogas Project at Iron Creek Hutterite Colony
SYNOPSIS: The Iron Creek Hutterite Colony turned to biogas as a means of solving its power, heating and manure problems. The operation set up by Grant Meikle of Ponoka is the first BioGem Power System in North America. Based on technology developed in Europe, Grant is adapting it to the North American environment. BioGem appears to have solved the problems that undermined other biogas operations and that has a lot to do with insulation and managing hydrogen sulphide.

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